Flooding, beach erosion, maybe tornadoes… Hermine’s got it all.

Hermine as it approached Florida on September 1. (NOAA)

Ah, Labor Day: A time to relax on the sand, while beach chairs fly around like banshees and crabs tremble in their holes beneath thundering surf.

OK, so this holiday weekend isn’t like most, with Hurricane-turned-Tropical Storm Hermine making its way through Florida and up the East Coast. Anybody attempting to get some beach time might be carried into coastal neighborhoods on huge waves... not that these guys in the Florida Keys care about that:

The forecast from the National Hurricane Center has the storm—the first hurricane to make landfall in Florida since 2005—crawling this weekend past the Carolinas to the Mid-Atlantic, where it will possibly slow down and direct a tremendous amount of wind and storm surge toward the coast. There’s a risk of flooding, beach erosion (folks on the Jersey Shore are probably thinking about Sandy right now), and tornadoes.

NHC/NOAA

The rain will be immense in some states, as seen in this tick-tock precipitation forecast from the NWS Weather Prediction Center:

NWS/WPC

All in all, it’s a great time to get reacquainted with that old Monopoly board in the closet while monitoring the latest weather bulletins.

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