Donald Trump
Yuri Gripas/Reuters

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Climate changes: President Donald Trump’s advisers are scheduled to meet today to hash out the U.S. position on the Paris accord on climate change, with Trump expected to make a decision next month on whether to withdraw the country from the landmark 2015 agreement. Right now, remaining in the pact appears more likely, despite Trump's campaign pledges to the contrary The New York Times reports:

On the campaign trail, Mr. Trump vowed to “cancel” the climate deal, and his most politically conservative advisers, including his senior strategist Stephen K. Bannon, have pushed him to follow through. But Mr. Bannon’s influence has waned in recent weeks, while authority has risen for Mr. Trump’s daughter Ivanka and son-in-law, Jared Kushner, who advocate staying in the accord.

Data trove: Former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer and a team of researchers have been working behind closed doors to assemble a massive open database, called USAFacts.org, in a nonpartisan effort to analyze revenue and spending across federal, state, and local governments. (New York Times)

Transit limbo: It looks like the Trump administration wants to move sooner rather than later on cuts to two major transit grant programs affecting cities, casting uncertainty over in-progress projects, including several in Atlanta. (Next City, Atlanta Journal Constitution)

Needle vending: Las Vegas has become the first city in the nation to try vending machines to dispense clean needles to intravenous drug users, through a pilot program aiming to reduce diseases like HIV and hepatitis C. (L.A. Times)

Seattle showdown: Former Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn is trying to reclaim his old job, announcing his challenge to incumbent Ed Murray as the latter faces sexual abuse charges. McGinn was known as a fiercely independent mayor, pushing for bike lanes and light rail and clashing with city council over police reform and other issues. (Seattle Times)

Big city identity: A Bloomberg View column looks at Turkey’s referendum —which succeeded despite rejection from its three big cities—as part of the worldwide trend of urban vs. rural divides. But rather than attaching the trend to globalization, the author points to “civicism”: the concept of a local urban identity outweighing the national one.

On the air: CityLab’s Brentin Mock speaks with WESA’s “Criminal (In)Justice” about his February article: "What Police and Poor Communities Really Think of Each Other.” Listen here.

The urban lens:

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