Reuters/Mike Bradley

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

From sea to rising sea: The Union of Concerned Scientists has mapped out a timeline for when U.S. cities can expect to be inundated with water over the coming decades, with up to 690 coastal areas—including Boston, Miami, Oakland, and four of the five boroughs of New York City—predicted to see chronic flooding by the century’s end. CNN reports:

Residents of roughly 500 cities across the US will be faced with the same choices by the end of the century: whether to mitigate or to abandon their homes.

"In hundreds of coastal American cities and towns, decades before sea-level rise permanently puts land underwater, chronic, disruptive high tide flooding arrives and makes it impossible to carry on business as usual in impacted areas," Spanger-Siegfried said.

Fight for neutrality: Forty-five mayors joined tech giants like Google and Amazon in protests across the country Wednesday opposing the Trump administration’s plans to roll back net neutrality. They stressed the importance of a level playing field for internet content. (State Scoop, Quartz)

Riding with guns: Tennessee’s four largest cities are now subject to a a new NRA-backed state law they opposed that allows guns on public buses. But they’re not going out of their way to tell the public about it. (AP)

Next-level tech: New York University has released the largest ever public data set using advanced LiDAR technology —you know it from speed cameras—capturing Dublin’s city center. Tech Crunch says open access to this scale and quality of data has big implications for urban planning and engineering projects, everything from driverless cars to tracking disease.

Rebranding on the road: The Huffington Post is shaking up its image as a haven for coastal elites with a seven-week, 23-city bus tour into Middle America, dispatching reporters and collecting stories from residents. (Politico)

Data sanctuary: In Seattle, a former Microsoft exec will bolster a data privacy program that’s putting new focus on protecting the sensitive information of undocumented immigrants—one of several recent data-driven experiments from sanctuary cities. (State Scoop)

Dead highway: The long-discussed controversial plan to build a $1.5 billion six-lane toll road next to downtown Dallas appears to be null, with the majority of the current city council prepared to vote against the Trinity Parkway project. (Dallas News)

The urban lens:

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