California Governor Jerry Brown is pictured.
California Governor Jerry Brown Max Whittaker/Reuters

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Climate summit: Tonight California Governor Jerry Brown plans to issue a sweeping invitation to a 2018 global climate action summit in San Francisco—making his announcement via videoconference to Hamburg, where President Trump and other officials will be negotiating a statement on the Paris accord. The New York Times reports:

The California summit meeting is part of a broad effort to both galvanize local organizations newly energized by the withdrawal of the United States from the climate deal, and to begin making good on pledges that thousands of businesses and municipalities already made in Paris. According to Governor Brown’s office, it will be the first meeting an American state has hosted to support the United Nations’ climate change negotiations.

  • See also: As the president arrives in Hamburg for the G20 summit, protesters are ready in the German city known for its “vibrant communities of leftists, anarchists and other assorted enemies of the ruthless capitalism that Trump represents.” (Time)

Grand Central’s moment: A silver lining to the “summer of hell” for New York’s Penn Station is that Grand Central Terminal may get its moment in the sun, in temporarily hosting six Amtrak long-distance routes. One writer says this could be a reminder of “why beautiful and welcoming gateways remain so important to our cities.” (New York Times)

Music mecca meltdown: The three major music cities in the U.S.—Austin, New Orleans, and Nashville—are now at risk of endangering the local culture that made them famous, as rising rents alienate musicians and venues. (Guardian)

Bike equity barriers: A new report looking at Philadelphia, Chicago, and Brooklyn identified traffic risks, high prices, and the potential for crime and harassment as the biggest barriers to cycling for low-income communities and people of color. (Streetsblog)

  • In other biking news, a New York City study is trying to find out at what point the harm of air pollution outweighs the health benefits of cycling. (New York Times)

Tourist takeover: In historic cities across Europe, residents are getting displaced in favor of quaint hotels and seasonal rentals for tourists — fueled, in part, by the encroachment of Airbnb. (Deutsche Welle)\

Red state, blue city: The New York Times dives into city-vs.-state preemption battles across the U.S., with a handy infographic breaking down which states block their cities from passing laws about LGBT rights, plastic bag bans, public broadband, the minimum wage, and more.

The urban lens:

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