Rain clouds gather over New Orleans on Thursday. Gerald Herbert/AP

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

The Big Uneasy: Louisiana’s governor has declared a state of emergency for New Orleans as the threat of more rain comes to a city already grappling with widespread flooding, a malfunctioning drainage system, and government resignations. The AP reports:

[Mayor Mitch] Landrieu urged residents of some waterlogged neighborhoods to prepare for another possible round of flooding by moving vehicles to higher ground. All of the city's public schools were closed Thursday and were scheduled to be closed again on Friday. ...

The city's infrastructure was crumbling for years before the devastation unleashed in 2005 by levee breaches in Hurricane Katrina's aftermath. The federal government earmarked billions of dollars for repairs and upgrades after the hurricane, but the problems have persisted. Streets are pockmarked with potholes and sinkholes. The city's water system has been plagued by leaks from broken pipes and power outages leading to boil water advisories.

Tolling NYC: To help with New York City’s general transportation nightmare, a plan by Move NY shows how new tolls on routes that are now free —including the Brooklyn Bridge—could reduce traffic and generate big revenue. Versions of this “congestion pricing” plan are already floating within the state Assembly and Senate. (New York Times)

  • See also: Seattle has found one solution for cutting down car commuting—replace monthly parking fees with daily charges. (Seattle Times)

After hours: Amsterdam was the first to try it, and now the concept of a “night mayor”—who tends to the city at dark, especially its bars and nightlife—has spread from Europe to U.S. cities, including Pittsburgh, Orlando, and New York City. (Governing)

Obliging on immigration: While there’s much attention on “sanctuary cities” resisting the White House, a wave of mostly smaller communities—including 18 counties in Texas—have signed on to agreements allowing feds access to their local jails to sniff out immigration violations. (FiveThirtyEight)

August off: It’s that time of year again when Paris becomes “an elegant ghost town,” as not only residents but also shops, businesses, and restaurants take a monthlong vacation. The tradition dates back all to the Popular Front movement of the 1930s, but some are wondering if it will last under new President Emmanuel Macron’s labor goals. (Washington Post)

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