Equity

A man stands on a railway bridge to check the level of a flooded river.

Mapping Where Environmental Justice is Most Threatened in the Carolinas

Eight places have long been vulnerable—and without them, we may not have the language, knowledge, and tools to fight environmental injustice in the age of climate change.

A man sits facing a flooded parking lot and apartment buildings on the other side.

The Black Communities That Have Fought for Their Right to Exist in the Carolinas

The African-American families embroiled in litigation against toxic animal-feeding operations join a long history of black communities fighting for the right to their health in the Carolinas.

When a Hospital Plays Housing Developer

A children’s hospital in Columbus, Ohio, is trying to treat a difficult patient: Its own struggling neighborhood.

Three people study at a long table in a library hall.

Worry Less About Crumbling Roads, More About Crumbling Libraries

America’s social infrastructure is falling apart, and it’s hurting democracy.

A worker repairs a Texas home after Hurricane Harvey in September 2017.

Why Hurricanes Hit Immigrants Hardest

A new report details the challenges that Houston’s immigrant population faced after Harvey—and offers a glimpse of what might await residents of the Carolinas after Florence.

Hurricane Kids: What We Know About Young Storm Victims

Children are among the most vulnerable victims of any natural disaster. Some 645,000 young Puerto Ricans experienced the trauma of Hurricane Maria.

The Fight for LGBT Rights Has Moved to the Suburbs

Many Americans still associate LGBTQ life with urban “gayborhoods.” But the Masterpiece Cakeshop case highlights how sexual diversity in suburbia is growing.

What’s at Stake in Washington’s Heated Battle Over Tipped Workers

Does paying tipped workers the minimum wage spell death for the city's restaurant industry, or dignity for the city's employees?

Philadelphia's police captain

‘Policing for Profit’ in Philadelphia Comes to an End

For decades, the city’s police department confiscated the property and cash of criminal suspects, even without convicting them of a crime, and used those seized assets to pay their salaries and buy equipment. No more.

When Transit Agencies Spy on Riders

For months, the Bay Area’s transit agency sent license plate information to federal immigration authorities, violating its own “sanctuary” policy.

A large tank truck parked in front of new apartment buildings.

The Divides Within, and Between, Urban and Rural America

Economic growth is not only uneven between urban and rural places—it is uneven within them, too.

A mural on the side of a building shows a man standing in a city street.

The Polarizing Mayor Who Embodied ‘Blue-Collar Conservatism’

Frank Rizzo, Philadelphia’s mayor from 1972 to 1980, appealed to “law and order” and white working-class identity—a sign of politics to come, says the author of a new book.

A crowd of onlookers watches fire consume the National Museum of Brazil in Rio de Janeiro on September 3.

Rio's National Museum Fire Was Not Just an Accident

The fire that destroyed the National Museum of Brazil in Rio de Janeiro was part of a larger campaign of disinvestment aimed at the country’s history and culture.

Can Banning Privatization Keep Water Cheap, Safe, and Flowing?

Baltimore voters are deciding whether to ban privatization of the water utility. But without the infusion of private investment, can cities continue to afford providing safe, inexpensive water?

In Toronto, Ford Nation Strikes Back

Doug Ford, the brother of the late and disgraced former mayor of Toronto, Rob Ford, has thrown a local election into chaos.

After Florence, the Gullah Could Face New Threats

Thousands of acres throughout the flooded Carolinas are heir’s property, a form of land ownership that leaves residents vulnerable to speculators.

NIMBYs Really Hate Developers When They Turn a Profit

A new study unpacks the many motivations behind the "evil developer" narrative.

Dublin’s Housing Crisis Reaches a Boiling Point

When activists occupied a long-vacant building, the police response seemed to confirm suspicion that the state is siding with landlords.

Why Won’t Ben Carson Confront Discrimination?

HUD Secretary Ben Carson announced that he would be launching a “landlord engagement listening tour” later this month, but discrimination by many landlords can already be heard quite loudly.

visualization of weather patterns

Mapping the Unequal Burden of Hurricane Florence

The path of the powerful storm is only one way to understand the scope of its likely burden.

A photo of the two mayors using ladles to pack lunches.

Don’t Overlook Equity Issues in City Climate-Action Plans

Cities that fail to make issues of equity and empowerment central to climate-action initiatives are not living up to the values of the movement, says a former mayor of Portland, Oregon.