Equity

a photo of Los Angeles

The State of Census 2020 Is Distrust

Across political persuasions, a majority of Americans are convinced that adding a citizen question will render the 2020 census inaccurate.

A sanitation employee helps homeless people with their possessions in New Orleans in October 2017.

Because of Louisiana, the Minimum Wage in New Orleans Is a Poverty Wage

Around the World Day of Social Justice, we should consider why cities pay poverty wages, and why 28 states can preempt local efforts to raise the minimum wage.

A ferry docked next to a warehouse in Long Island City, Queens

Why the Amazon Pushback Is Also About Immigrants

After the HQ2 cancellation in Queens, Amazon’s connections to federal immigration enforcement are drawing scrutiny and criticism in other cities, too.

A gun-control rally in Pittsburgh's Market Square, Saturday, March 24, 2018.

Inside Pittsburgh's Battle Over Gun Control Laws

Pittsburgh could be the bellwether city in Pennsylvania, defying state law to pass gun control ordinances, but first it has to get past its own district attorney.

Why Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto Won’t Back Down on Gun Control

After the Tree of Life synagogue shooting, Pittsburgh Mayor Bill Peduto stands committed to gun control legislation despite a direct confrontation with Pennsylvania state law.

A photo of Anne Wojcicki, CEO and co-founder of 23andMe, speaking at a conference.

Where Women Startup Founders Are Gaining Ground

The share of VC-backed startups with women founders has grown dramatically, but Silicon Valley lags behind other hubs.

A photo of a design maquette for the Obama Presidential Center planned for Jackson Park and designed by Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects with Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates.

Why the Case Against the Obama Presidential Center Is So Important

A judge has ruled that a lawsuit brought by Chicago preservationists can proceed, dealing a blow to Barack Obama's plans to build his library in Jackson Park.

Mapping the Growing Gap Between Job Seekers and Employers

Mapping job openings with available employees in major U.S. cities reveals a striking spatial mismatch, according to a new Urban Institute report.

Berlin Builds an Arsenal of Ideas to Stage a Housing Revolution

The proposals might seem radical—from banning huge corporate landlords to freezing rents for five years—but polls show the public is ready for something dramatic.

The Curious Politics of a Montreal Mega-Mall

The car-dependent suburb it’ll be built in wants to greenlight Royalmount against the city government’s wishes but it needs them to pay for the public infrastructure.

A photo of a new subdivision under construction in South Jordan, Utah.

A Red-State Take on a YIMBY Housing Bill

Utah’s SB 34, aimed at increasing the state’s supply of affordable housing, may hold lessons for booming cities of the Mountain West, and beyond.

Multicolored maps of Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Tampa, denoting neighborhood fragmentation

Urban Neighborhoods, Once Distinct by Race and Class, Are Blurring

Yet in cities, affluent white neighborhoods and high-poverty black ones are outliers, resisting the fragmentation shown with other types of neighborhoods.

A History of the American Public Library

A visual exploration of how a critical piece of social infrastructure came to be.

Farm manager Zodidi Meke at the Philippi Urban Agriculture Academy in Cape Town.

Cape Town Is Food-Rich, so Why Are Some Residents Food Insecure?

Cape Town in South Africa is a foodie destination. Some people in its renowned restaurant industry are trying to spread the food wealth citywide.

Without Amazon HQ2, What Happens to Housing in Queens?

The arrival of the tech company’s new headquarters was set to shake up the borough’s real estate market, driving up rents and spurring displacement. Now what?

A Border Patrol agent looks on near a border wall that separates the cities of Tijuana, Mexico, and San Diego.

Lawmakers Aim to Protect Private Landowners on U.S.-Mexico Border

Members of Congress hope to pass laws to help border-adjacent property owners who may be displaced through eminent domain if Trump’s border wall plans proceed.

Capturing Black Bottom, a Detroit Neighborhood Lost to Urban Renewal

“Black Bottom Street View,” now exhibiting at the Detroit Public Library, thoughtfully displays old images of the historic African American neighborhood in its final days.

A boarded-up bank

Are Reparations Baltimore’s Fix for Redlining, Investment Deprivation?

The solutions to Baltimore’s inequitable financing problems must be as radical as the policies that segregated the city in the first place, says Lawrence Brown.

New York’s Ejection of Amazon Is the Start of a Movement

NYC lawmakers who led a resistance campaign against HQ2 are declaring victory. And already, they have plans to escalate their opposition to tax incentives.

a photo of a used needle in a park in Lawrence, Massachusetts.

Why the Rural Opioid Crisis Is Different From the Urban One

As deaths from heroin, fentanyl, and prescription opioids soar in the U.S., a new study looks at the geographic factors driving the drug overdose epidemic.

Police Policy for Sale

Lexipol, a private for-profit company, has quietly become one of the most powerful voices in American law enforcement policy.