Equity

The City That’s Giving People Money

Randomly selected Stockton residents are receiving $500 a month. The experiment might prove that guaranteed income works.

A line of stores in Westport, Connecticut

Separated by Design: How Some of America’s Richest Towns Fight Affordable Housing

In southwest Connecticut, the gap between rich and poor is wider than anywhere else in the country. Invisible walls created by local zoning boards and the state government block affordable housing and, by extension, the people who need it.

Childhood Asthma: A Lingering Effect of Redlining

New research shows that disparities in housing contribute to disparities in one of the most common chronic diseases afflicting children.

A woman walks down a city street across from a new apartment and condominium building.

How Housing Supply Became the Most Controversial Issue in Urbanism

New research has kicked off a war of words among urban scholars over the push for upzoning to increase cities’ housing supply.

Netflix’s ‘Street Food’ Reveals a Thriving and Threatened Culture

In cities globally, street vendors are an essential source of food and provide critical income to women but recent crackdowns are threatening this lifestyle.

‘Corporate Preemption’ Is Making It Harder for Cities to Protect Workers

Thanks to a recent Supreme Court ruling, more and more companies are using forced arbitration to undermine state and local labor laws.

The Resegregation of Baton Rouge Public Schools

Residents of the majority-white southeast corner of Baton Rouge want to make their own city, complete with its own schools, breaking away from the majority-black parts of town.

A map of the money service-class workers have left over after paying for housing

Blue-Collar and Service Workers Fare Better Outside Superstar Cities

How much money do workers have after paying housing costs? For working-class and service workers in superstar cities, the affordable housing crisis hits harder.

Opponents of SB 50.

Despite Resistance, Cities Turn to Density to Tackle Housing Inequality

Residential “upzoning” policies being adopted from Minneapolis to Seattle were once politically out of the question. Now they’re just politically fraught.

The Problem With Outlawing Distracted Walking

A New York lawmaker wants to fine pedestrians who text while crossing streets. Street-safety advocates say that’s ineffective, and may even cause more harm.

Alicia Glen speaks into a microphone at a podium inside a tent.

‘You Can't Just Show Up’: Alicia Glen on Amazon's Queens Defeat

In an interview, the former deputy mayor under Bill de Blasio says diversity is the key to New York’s growth: “Even with all of our warts, we’re the best.”

The ‘Broken Windows’ Debate Survives Its Creators

The theory, introduced in a 1982 Atlantic article, that maintaining order could reduce the incidence of serious crimes remains contentious 35 years later.

‘Fairbnb’ Wants to Be the Unproblematic Alternative to Airbnb

The vacation rental industry is mired in claims that it harms neighborhoods and housing markets. Can a nonprofit co-op make the tourist trend a community asset?

An Illustrated History of New York City’s Playgrounds

There are more than 2,000 playgrounds spread across New York City. Ariel Aberg-Riger explores the creative and political history of concrete jungle’s jungle gyms.

A photo of a Somali refugee camp at Liboi, Kenya, in 1992.

A New Way of Seeing the Global Migration Crisis

A book on global migrants and refugees by novelist Teju Cole and photographer Fazal Sheikh explores the agency and humanity of the displaced and dispossessed.

The coast of Vieques island off Puerto Rico.

Tesla’s Busted Solar Panels on Vieques Are a Cautionary Tale

After Hurricane María plunged the island off Puerto Rico into darkness, Tesla’s arrival heralded the dawn of a microgrid future. But it wasn’t that easy.

A photo of passersby walking under a surveillance camera that is part of a facial recognition technology test at Berlin Suedkreuz station in Berlin, Germany.

The Bay Area’s Spy Camera Ban Is Only the Beginning

San Francisco just became the first city to ban use of facial recognition technology by government entities. Oakland may be next.

Photo of a public fountain monument in a park.

The First City to Remove and Replace a Confederate Monument?

Native-American lawmakers pushed the removal of a 100-year old Confederate monument in Helena, Montana, in 2017. It’s being replaced by a public art project.

HUD Rule Targeting Immigrant Families Could Evict 55,000 Children

A Trump administration regulation targeting undocumented immigrants seeks to boot families if even one person is not eligible to receive public housing aid.

Voters Chose to Decriminalize a Drug. Now the City Faces a Choice.

A ballot measure directs the city to decriminalize magic mushrooms. Officials must now decide how—or if—they plan to make that happen.

People in canoes on the water

A Native American Tribe Gets Rent as Reparations in Seattle

The Duwamish Tribe says the United States never made good on an 1855 treaty covering land that is now Seattle. So, some people are voluntarily paying them rent.