Equity

The Nerd That Ate Seattle

Paul Allen was the city’s preeminent philanthropist and real estate developer up until his death earlier this week. His legacy reveals something broader about the twinned nature of Seattle and its native software son.

Netflix’s ‘Stay Here’ Is a Baffling Show About Renovating Airbnbs

Binge-watch it if you’re not sure what to do with your extra house.

Why Are So Many People In San Jose Fighting Housing for Teachers?

The school system’s plan to build affordable apartment units for the city’s teachers has triggered a fierce backlash in one affluent area.

The interior of Grand Central Station

Saving Grand Central, 40 Years Later: a Cautionary Tale

The Supreme Court ruling that rescued the icon also opened the door for other, more controversial preservation cases.

White House to Protesters: ‘Get Off My Lawn!’

Closing the sidewalk in front of the President’s home would mean demolishing the country’s most vital public forum—and another norm shattered by the Trump administration.

vacant store fronts in mining town in Arizona

America’s Worsening Geographic Inequality

The economic gap between have and have-not places continues to widen.

Why the U.S. Needs Better Crime Reporting Statistics

What's really the most dangerous American city? The way crimes are currently counted can easily confuse and mislead.

The backs of people facing forward in a church.

How Dismantling the Voting Rights Act Helped Georgia Discriminate Again

A decade ago, Georgia tried to implement a similar “exact-match” voter registration system but was thwarted by a key section of the Voting Rights Act. That section has been removed, leaving voters of color unprotected.

How a Booming City Can Be More Equitable

In Durham, North Carolina, abandoned factories are becoming tech hubs and microbreweries. But building a shared commitment to its most vulnerable citizens could be a trickier feat of redevelopment.

Leana Wen stands in the emergency department at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, during her medical residency.

Leana Wen Takes Her Fight for Women’s Health National

Baltimore City’s health commissioner leaves her post Friday to become president of Planned Parenthood, and she’s bringing her relentless work ethic along with her.

Where It’s Legal to Reverse the Vote of the People

More citizen-initiated measures are making it onto the ballot than ever before. But in cities and states where they’re able, legislators are taking steps to alter them.

The ‘Cafes’ Where Women Go to Breastfeed

Come for the free lactation consultation. Stay for the fellow moms.

How America Fails at Communicating Flood Risks

We have good data about flood risks. The challenge is getting it to people when they need it, in a way that’s useful.

Interpreting Africa’s Visible, and Invisible, Borders

In the eighth “Invisible Borders” road trip, a group of African artists and writers send dispatches from the continent’s cities and border towns.

Adults and children explore an urban play-garden.

A City That Takes Climate Change Seriously: Paris

The French capital, under Mayor Anne Hidalgo, could be a model for how cities can mitigate and plan for climate change. But change has not come easily.

Preserving the Shotgun Homes of Miami’s 19th Century Immigrants

Many descendants of the original Coconut Grove community own property in the neighborhood today, but development is a serious concern and a large part of the community is fighting to protect their homes.

Making Space For Indigenous Cultures

An artist contemplates Mayan life in the face of a U.S. architectural icon that fails to truly represent it.

For Once, Racism Didn’t Work in Defending a Chicago Police Officer

The police officer who killed Laquan McDonald was convicted on Friday, despite a "Black Boogeyman" stereotype he cited to justify his fear of the unarmed teenager.

A shopper in Boston's Jamaica Plain, which, like many urban neighborhoods, has experienced dramatic demographic shifts in recent decades.

When Neighborhood Diversity Meets White Anxiety

The perception of demographic change can be more powerful than the reality of it, according to new research on how white residents can feel threatened by racial and ethnic shifts.

Congressional districts, by density.

How the Suburbs Will Swing the Midterm Election

Close congressional races this November will likely hinge on the moods of suburban voters, a new CityLab analysis finds.