Equity

If Rent Were Affordable, The Average Household Would Save $6,200 a Year

A new analysis points to the benefits of ending the severe affordability crisis.

This Startup Helps You Buy a House (If You Hand Over Your Airbnb Income)

For buyers in hot real-estate markets, a new kind of mortgage offered by a company called Loftium might offer a way to purchase a home.

Visitors to (The) Living Room Project.

A (Short-Lived) Living Room for the Homeless

As a housing crisis afflicts Seattle, a pop-up parklet brought something rare to the city’s most vulnerable residents: a welcoming public space.

How to Save a Dying Suburb

For older, inner-ring suburbs in the Northeast and Midwest, the best hope often lies in merging with the city.

How Houston homeownership rates overlap with Harvey-induced floods.

Mapping Harvey's Impact on Houston's Homeowners

The Urban Institute visualizes the havoc wreaked by the storm on first-time, minority homeowners.

A Wary South Side Eyes Obama's Return

The Obama Presidential Center is poised to transform Chicago’s Jackson Park, as well as its surrounding neighborhoods. But residents want a binding community benefits agreement

High-Paying Jobs Alone Won't Save Big Cities

If cities are going to sell the farm to Amazon, then the proceeds better benefit the entire community, especially those who can easily be left behind.

A painted mural of a steelworker surrounded by colorful graffiti

The Rust Belt Needs Legal Immigration

A new study finds that the Midwest is heavily dependent on this “demographic lifeline.”

A boy uses his laptop to do homework

Broadband Is Largely Inaccessible to Those Who Need it Most

Because of high prices and low accessibility, poor and rural communities are the least likely to subscribe to high-speed internet.

Why Houston Housing Is Poised to Get More Expensive and Unequal

If the post-Katrina New Orleans experience is any indication, the development of low-income housing in Houston will be a long time coming.

Protesters in St. Louis on Friday.

The Next Wave of Outrage in St. Louis

Former police officer Jason Stockley was acquitted of murder Friday in a highly anticipated case, exposing the continued fragility of the region three years after Michael Brown’s death.

A Juggalo standing in front of Buffalo City Hall.

The Juggalo March Is Not a Joke

Facepainted fans of the Insane Clown Posse are gathering on the National Mall this weekend. And they have something important to say.

Motel 6 Is Probably Not the Only Company Tipping Off Immigration Agents

“It calls into question how far ICE can go, or how far private entities can go with ICE.”

A classroom with students and two teachers viewed through a window in the classroom door

The Controversy Behind Chicago's Diploma Mandate

Mayor Rahm Emanuel wants to set students up for success after graduation. But at public schools, even the best ideas often have unintended consequences.

A pediatrician uses a light to peer inside a young boy's mouth as she examines him at a free clinic for the poor and uninsured.

What Urban Doctors Need to Understand About Patients' Health

Poor health isn’t just a result of individual choice. A program at Washington University in St. Louis teaches first-year medical students how the city’s environment shapes well-being.

The Rise of Public-Sector Crowdfunding

Around the country, local governments are soliciting donations for everything from dog parks to public defenders. Is this a practical response to budget cuts or a sign that publicly funded services are in trouble?

Metro Incomes Rise, But Inequality Remains Stubborn

The new Census numbers are “a sign of sunshine, with some clouds.”

Even Liberals Can Be Refugee NIMBYs

A new study finds that a collective action problem plagues support for settling displaced people in America.

A homeless man is pictured in Philadelphia.

Lab Report: America's Poorest Big City

A morning roundup of the day’s news.

Gwendel Wilson

The Infrastructure of the Opioid Epidemic

On Boston’s “Methadone Mile,” the city’s opioid users cluster around a few-block-stretch, where they find some support, and a sweeping range of treatment services. They are also out of sight of the rest of the city.