America can be divided into two distinct classes, the stuck and the mobile

A smaller share of Americans moved last year that at any time on record, as I noted in a previous post. Nearly six in ten Americans live in the state where they were born, according to the U.S. Census bureau. But there is considerable variation from state to state, as the map (above) by Zara Matheson of the Martin Prosperity Institute shows. More than three quarters of the people in Louisiana (78.9 percent), Michigan (76.6 percent) and Ohio (75.1 percent) were born there, as opposed to just 24.3 percent of Nevadans, 35.2 percent of Floridians, 37.2 percent of the residents of Washington, D.C., and 37.7 percent of Arizonans. A high level of home-grown residents is also indicative of a lack of inflow of new people.

There is a distinctive “stuck belt” across the middle of the country running from Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, and Iowa, down through West Virginia and into the Sunbelt states of Kentucky, Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana. Mobility is largely a bi-coastal—plus Rocky Mountain state—phenomenon.

America can be divided into two distinct classes, the stuck and the mobile. The mobile possess the resources and the inclination to seek out and move to locations where they pursue economic opportunity. Too many Americans are stuck in places with limited resources and opportunities. This geography of the stuck and mobile is a key axis of cleavage in the United States.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Life

    How Australia Conquered Guns, and Why America Can't

    Gun control advocates point to Australia for inspiration in ending gun violence. The Australian Ambassador to the United States, Joe Hockey, thinks they should stop.

  2. Transportation

    How Seattle Is Winning the War on the Car Commute

    Despite massive job growth, just 25 percent of workers drove themselves in 2017.

  3. Transportation

    The Attainable Wonders of Wakandan Transit

    Why can’t we have the vibranium-powered passenger trains of the Black Panther universe?

  4. POV

    What It Would Actually Take to Fund Infrastructure

    Commentators have broadly agreed Trump’s infrastructure proposal is not nearly enough. Here’s a blueprint for how to do better.

  5. A sculpture of the Airbnb logo is pictured.
    Life

    Airbnb and the Unintended Consequences of 'Disruption'

    Tech analysts are prone to predicting utopia or dystopia. They’re worse at imagining the side effects of a firm's success.