The best in season's greetings

It's that time of year again, when political commentators parse the perfectly benign White House holiday card for signs of the War on Christmas. This year's presidential season's greetings have struck a particular nerve with some (Sarah Palin) for not being, well, Christmas-y enough (Christmas as it's defined by "faith, family and freedom").

This got us thinking. What's on the other holiday cards on your mantel signed by elected officials? If you're lucky, and you know just the right mid-level City Hall bureaucrats, you probably got a card this holiday season from your mayor. If you didn't, please enjoy the ones that we found instead.

San Juan: Mayor Jorge Santini claims to be promoting a local wildlife museum with this bold choice, complete with a taxidermied leopard and antelope.

These appear to be backup shots from the same shoot (which have also gone viral) that did not make the cut:

Maui: For a more traditional approach, the mayor of Maui and his family wish you peace and joy:

North Miami: In this one, the mayor smartly thought to include the city councilmen:

Yucaipa and Salisbury: Here we have similar approaches from the cities of California and Maryland:


Ignace: This one, from Mayor Lee Kennard of a township in Ontario, Canada, is particularly charming:

Ottawa: Mayor Jim Watson keeps it minimalist (and bilingual!):

And then we have a whole class of mayors who have come up with the rather brilliant solution of inviting school children to compete to design the city's official holiday card. Good luck to their political opponents finding offense in these! (From top to bottom, from St. Louis, Doral, Texas and Myrtle Beach, South Carolina):

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