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The city received the top score in a federal school funding challenge

Sure, the city has suffered more than its share of hard knocks. But it just won first place in a federal contest. The prize - five years of funding for an ambitious "cradle-to-college" program, modeled after the Harlem Children's Zone

The money will increase services to families in northeast Buffalo, support neighborhood stabilization efforts and enhance opportunities at three local high schools. It will also fund an early childhood center. The initiative is being led by Westminster Community Charter School, and M&T Bank has pledged to match federal funds.

Buffalo's Promise Neighborhood will receive  $1.5 million in its first year. Other winners are Minneapolis, San Antonio, Clay, Jackson and Owsley counties in Kentucky, and Hayward, Calif.

Read more at the Buffalo News.

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