Reuters

That's the number of mayors who have pledged their support to a new city-based gay marriage advocacy group

All politics is local. At least, that's the organizing principle behind 'Mayors for Freedom to Marry,' a new group pushing for gay marriage rights across the country.

The group brings together mayors from America's four largest cities (that's New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emmanuel, Houston Mayor Annise Parker and Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa) along with representatives from Boston, San Diego, Denver, Kansas City and Washington, D.C.

Smaller locales are represented too. All told, 80 mayors signed on. If you're curious, here's a complete list.

All have committed to employing "tailored strategies for making the case for the freedom to marry in their communities." According to Marketwatch:

Many mayors who represent cities in states where marriage is not yet a reality will advocate to pass laws to secure the freedom to marry. Others will make the case to their congressional representatives to end federal marriage discrimination by repealing the so-called Defense of Marriage Act (DOMA). All are making a statement as to why marriage matters in their communities, how it improves the quality of life for their constituents, and how it makes their communities economically stronger.

About the Author

Amanda Erickson

Amanda Erickson is a former senior associate editor at CityLab. 

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