The Census Bureau is getting ready for the release of all the forms from its 1940 count.

On April 2, the National Archives will release a treasure trove of previously unavailable records from the 1940 Census count. The U.S. Census Bureau, understandably, is pretty excited about it, and that excitement has resulted in some tantalizing infographics to whet our appetites. In the one below, they compare the five largest U.S. cities in 1940 and 2010. Four (New York, Los Angeles, Chicago and Philadelphia) are on both lists. But 1940s superpower Detroit has been replaced by Houston in 2010.

 

Another graphic looks at which states had the highest percentage of people in the labor force. The East Coast was a powerhouse in 1940, not so much in 2010:

And finally, for fun, the states with the highest ration of men to women:

See more insights on the 1940 data here.

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