A builder designs the smallest studios allowed by California zoning code.

How much space does a single person really need? That's a question housing developer Patrick Kennedy is trying to answer, as Apartment Therapy reports. Kennedy, who once lived in a 78-square-foot Airstream, designed a pre-fab studio that maximizes space in a big way. The 160-square-foot apartment (the smallest allowed by California building code) includes a couple of key features:

  • A 'smart bench' that transforms into a dining banquette or guest bed.
  • A couch by day, a queen-sized bed by night.
  • An appliance closet for your toaster, and a stove top that slips under the counter.

But Kennedy also has a couple of adjustments he'd like to make, based on feedback from a student who lived there for a couple of weeks. He plans to get rid of the open shower, raise the ceiling, and put in a sink big enough to fit a pasta pot.

There are a bunch of other nifty features. See a complete tour here:

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