Reuters/Carlos Barria

A group of Tibetan earthquake victims in China say they're being threaten with removal to make way for an eco-tourism center.

It's been two years since a 6.9 magnitude earthquake struck Gyegu, China, forcing most of its survivors to live in makeshift camps.

The residents of those camps (as seen above) are now reportedly being threatened with forcible removal to make way for an ecological tourism center.

Most of those being displaced are minority Tibetans. The government's perceived land grab has become particularly controversial as the homes of officials nearby have been spared from any seizures. 

According to a Reuters report, Gyegu has failed to rebuild residential areas, leaving citizens to deal with severely damaged structures and a waste-ridden canal. Many government structures, however, have since been rebuilt with the work being given mostly to migrant Han Chinese workers, adding another layer of discontent among local Tibetans.

Photo credit: REUTERS/Carlos Barria

 

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