Reuters/Carlos Barria

A group of Tibetan earthquake victims in China say they're being threaten with removal to make way for an eco-tourism center.

It's been two years since a 6.9 magnitude earthquake struck Gyegu, China, forcing most of its survivors to live in makeshift camps.

The residents of those camps (as seen above) are now reportedly being threatened with forcible removal to make way for an ecological tourism center.

Most of those being displaced are minority Tibetans. The government's perceived land grab has become particularly controversial as the homes of officials nearby have been spared from any seizures. 

According to a Reuters report, Gyegu has failed to rebuild residential areas, leaving citizens to deal with severely damaged structures and a waste-ridden canal. Many government structures, however, have since been rebuilt with the work being given mostly to migrant Han Chinese workers, adding another layer of discontent among local Tibetans.

Photo credit: REUTERS/Carlos Barria

 

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Design

    Is This Red, White, and Blue Elephant Worth Saving?

    Illinois politicians agree that Chicago’s Thompson Center should be replaced. Architects and preservationists beg to differ, and a new documentary presents their case.

  2. A Soviet map of London, labeled in Russian.
    Maps

    The Soviet Military Secretly Mapped the Entire World

    These intricate, curious maps were supposed to be destroyed. The ones that remain reveal a fascinating portrait of how the U.S.S.R. monitored the world.

  3. Maps

    Mapping Where Europe's Population Is Moving, Aging, and Finding Work

    Younger people are fleeing rural areas, migrating northward, and having fewer children. Here’s how that’s changing the region.

  4. Life

    Venice Mayor to Tourists: Stop Whining and Pay Up

    British visitors were overcharged for lunch, the U.K. press pounced, and now everyone is mad.

  5. A toxic site in Niagara Falls, New York, seen from above.
    Environment

    The Toxic 'Blank Spots' of Niagara Falls

    The region’s “chemical genies” of the early 20th century were heralded as reaching into the future to create a more abundant life for all. Instead, they deprived future generations of their health and well-being.