Reuters/Carlos Barria

A group of Tibetan earthquake victims in China say they're being threaten with removal to make way for an eco-tourism center.

It's been two years since a 6.9 magnitude earthquake struck Gyegu, China, forcing most of its survivors to live in makeshift camps.

The residents of those camps (as seen above) are now reportedly being threatened with forcible removal to make way for an ecological tourism center.

Most of those being displaced are minority Tibetans. The government's perceived land grab has become particularly controversial as the homes of officials nearby have been spared from any seizures. 

According to a Reuters report, Gyegu has failed to rebuild residential areas, leaving citizens to deal with severely damaged structures and a waste-ridden canal. Many government structures, however, have since been rebuilt with the work being given mostly to migrant Han Chinese workers, adding another layer of discontent among local Tibetans.

Photo credit: REUTERS/Carlos Barria

 

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. photo: A Lyft scooter on the streets of Oakland in July.
    Transportation

    4 Predictions for the Electric Scooter Industry

    Dockless e-scooters swept cities worldwide in 2018 and 2019. In 2020, expect the battery-powered micromobility revolution to take a new direction.

  2. photo: a pair of homes in Pittsburgh
    Equity

    The House Flippers of Pittsburgh Try a New Tactic

    As the city’s real estate market heats up, neighborhood groups say that cash investors use building code violations to encourage homeowners to sell.  

  3. Life

    The Cities Americans Want to Flee, and Where They Want to Go

    An Apartment List report reveals the cities apartment-hunters are targeting for their next move—and shows that tales of a California exodus may be overstated.

  4. Perspective

    Why Car-Free Streets Will Soon Be the Norm

    In cities like New York, Paris, Rotterdam, and soon San Francisco, car-free streets are emerging amid a growing movement.

  5. Life

    Can Toyota Turn Its Utopian Ideal Into a 'Real City'?

    The automaker-turned-mobility-company announced last week it wants to build a living, breathing urban laboratory from the ground up in Japan.

×