The Sustainable Native Communities thinks so.

This looks like a great project from Enterprise Community Partners. They write:

The Sustainable Native Communities Collaborative, an initiative of Enterprise Community Partners, supports culturally and environmentally sustainable affordable housing appropriate to American Indian communities nationwide. We help to build capacity through building relationships, focusing on core values specific to each place and rooted in the spirit, the community and the land. Through technical assistance and research of best practices, we can help a community to reduce their impact on the natural world, gain self-sufficiency and provide solutions for culturally appropriate, healthy and affordable housing.

Here's a video on the project:

Sustainable Native Communities Collaborative from Adventure Pictures on Vimeo.

The collaborative is supported by the National Endowment for the Arts.  For more information on its activities, start here.

This post originally appeared on the NRDC's Switchboard blog.

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