Reuters

A festival transforms Waltham, Massachusetts, into a place worthy of Jules Verne's admiration.

The third annual "Watch City Festival," a celebration of Steampunk culture, was held this past weekend in Waltham, Massachusetts.

The festival includes a Steampunk mobile home, a lecture by a Jules Verne historian flown in from France, and high-wheel bicycle rides. 

Waltham is closely tied to its 19th century industrial history, giving itself the nickname of "Watch City." In 1854, The Waltham Watch Company became the first company to produce timepieces on an assembly line. 

The Steampunk movement imagines the world through a Victorian-influenced vision of industry and art. 

Top image: Women stand on a performer who calls himself 'The Human Floor' as he lays on a bed of broken glass at the Watch City Festival in Waltham, Massachusetts May 13, 2012. (Reuters/Jessica Rinaldi)

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