Reuters

A festival transforms Waltham, Massachusetts, into a place worthy of Jules Verne's admiration.

The third annual "Watch City Festival," a celebration of Steampunk culture, was held this past weekend in Waltham, Massachusetts.

The festival includes a Steampunk mobile home, a lecture by a Jules Verne historian flown in from France, and high-wheel bicycle rides. 

Waltham is closely tied to its 19th century industrial history, giving itself the nickname of "Watch City." In 1854, The Waltham Watch Company became the first company to produce timepieces on an assembly line. 

The Steampunk movement imagines the world through a Victorian-influenced vision of industry and art. 

Top image: Women stand on a performer who calls himself 'The Human Floor' as he lays on a bed of broken glass at the Watch City Festival in Waltham, Massachusetts May 13, 2012. (Reuters/Jessica Rinaldi)

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Design

    How I. M. Pei Shaped the Modern City

    The architect, who died yesterday at the age of 102, designed iconic modern buildings on prominent sites around the world. Here are some that delight and confound CityLab.

  2. Life

    Having a Library or Cafe Down the Block Could Change Your Life

    Living close to public amenities—from parks to grocery stores—increases trust, decreases loneliness, and restores faith in local government.

  3. Opponents of SB 50.
    Equity

    Despite Resistance, Cities Turn to Density to Tackle Housing Inequality

    Residential “upzoning” policies being adopted from Minneapolis to Seattle were once politically out of the question. Now they’re just politically fraught.

  4. A map of the money service-class workers have left over after paying for housing
    Equity

    Blue-Collar and Service Workers Fare Better Outside Superstar Cities

    How much money do workers have after paying housing costs? For working-class and service workers in superstar cities, the affordable housing crisis hits harder.

  5. A ruined ancient temple in dense forest.
    Environment

    How the Ancient Maya Adapted to Climate Change

    Instead of focusing on the civilization’s final stages, looking at Mayan adaptations shows how their communities survived for as long as they did.