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That's how many new units of housing San Francisco added in 2011, the lowest since 1993.

San Francisco added 418 new units of housing in 2011, the lowest number in that city since 1993. And when you factor in demolitions and removal of illegal units, the net gain of units dropped to just 269.

That's a 78 percent decline from 2010, and about 12 percent of the city's 10-year-average, according to the San Francisco Chronicle. But there's a silver lining, the paper reports:

The good news, however, is that housing construction appears to be on the upswing. The Housing Inventory Report, presented to the Planning Commission Thursday, found that 1,998 units were approved for construction in 2011, 66 percent more than in 2010. In a continuing trend, 81 percent of that construction is in larger buildings of 20 or more units.

Also worth noting: Half of 2011's new construction was affordable housing, a percent that's likely to slip if and when construction heats up.

Photo credit: Dave Newman/Shutterstock

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