Shutterstock

That's how many new units of housing San Francisco added in 2011, the lowest since 1993.

San Francisco added 418 new units of housing in 2011, the lowest number in that city since 1993. And when you factor in demolitions and removal of illegal units, the net gain of units dropped to just 269.

That's a 78 percent decline from 2010, and about 12 percent of the city's 10-year-average, according to the San Francisco Chronicle. But there's a silver lining, the paper reports:

The good news, however, is that housing construction appears to be on the upswing. The Housing Inventory Report, presented to the Planning Commission Thursday, found that 1,998 units were approved for construction in 2011, 66 percent more than in 2010. In a continuing trend, 81 percent of that construction is in larger buildings of 20 or more units.

Also worth noting: Half of 2011's new construction was affordable housing, a percent that's likely to slip if and when construction heats up.

Photo credit: Dave Newman/Shutterstock

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Transportation

    A Horrifying Glimpse Into Your Dystopian Future Transit Commute

    A comic artist’s take on what the future of transportation might really feel like.

  2. A cyclist rides on the bike lane in the Mid Market neighborhood during Bike to Work Day in San Francisco,
    Perspective

    Why Asking for Bike Lanes Isn't Smart

    In the 1930s big auto dreamed up freeways and demanded massive car infrastructure. Micromobility needs its own Futurama—one where cars are marginalized.

  3. a photo of bikes on a bridge in Amsterdam
    Transportation

    Street by Street, Amsterdam Is Cutting Cars Out of the Picture

    Armed with a street-design tool called the knip, the Dutch capital is slashing car access in the city center, and expanding public transit hours.

  4. Life

    Why Do Instagram Playgrounds Keep Calling Themselves Museums?

    The bustling industry of immersive, Instagram-friendly experiences has put a new spin on the word museum.

  5. Uber Eats worker
    Life

    The Millennial Urban Lifestyle Is About to Get More Expensive

    As WeWork crashes and Uber bleeds cash, the consumer-tech gold rush may be coming to an end.

×