Reuters

The NATO Summit wraps up, and Chicago returns to normal.

It's been a long week for Chicago's police and protesters.

The city has been gearing up for the NATO Summit for months, developing a sophisticated (and contentious) security system. Thousands of activists crowded the streets over the weekend, expressing their concerns in song, signs and silly string. There were some arrest and threats of violence, but few major problems.

Last night, many of the city's temporary residents departed, returning to their homes across the country. "We apologize to the people of Chicago for any inconvenience, but sometimes, to change people, you need to sacrifice," one protester told the Chicago Tribune. "Thank you very much," he added.

Photo credit: Adrees Latif/Reuters

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