Reuters

Scenes from Syria's Homs.

Violent attacks continue in the Syrian city of Homs, where mortars are falling "every minute," according to the Los Angeles Times. Syrian authorities are allegedly using drones to direct the shelling.

Homs has been the "epicenter" of the  revolt against the authoritarian leader President Bashar Assad, the Los Angeles Times reports. "People are dying all around me," said citizen journalist Waleed Fares, in the hospital for a shrapnel wound to his abdomen. "There are no real medical personnel here, just medical students."

The paper writes:

Parts of Syria's third-largest city were rapidly being reduced to rubble. "All of Homs is like Bab Amro," said an opposition activist reached inside Homs, referring to a former rebel-controlled Homs neighborhood pummeled this year by weeks of shelling.

Below, scenes from the city, courtesy of Reuters:



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