Baby Boomers over 65 are moving to the coasts.

Between now and 2031, 10,000 Baby Boomers will turn 65 each day. It's a demographic shift that will define the near future of the United States. 

The map below, created by Ad Age using U.S. Census data, gives us some clues. It shows where people 65 and over moved to between 2000-2010. Red counties show places that had a net loss in their senior population, while dark blue counties had a population change of 30 percent or more.

Click on the map for the interactive version

The biggest losses are in the Great Plains states of Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, North Dakota, western Oklahoma, and northern Texas, though people 65 and older are moving to metros like Kansas City, Oklahoma City, Houston, Austin, and Dallas. The East and West coasts are also attracting the 65 and older crowd.

And if you compare the map above with this map, showing the overall population changes from 2000-2010, they look very similar. A dark red cuts through the middle of the country while dark blue concentrates along the coasts and in the South. 

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