Reuters

Protesters decried the most recent ruling on deposed leader Hosni Mubarak.

Egyptian protestors crammed into Tahrir Square this weekend, calling for a clean break with the past. Last week, a court sentenced deposed leader Hosni Mubarak to life in jail for violence against thousands of protesters. But many say this is not enough. According to the New York Times, Egyptian pro-democracy campaigners called on Sunday for a new uprising, saying justice was not served. The paper writes:

Gathering once again in Tahrir Square, the demonstrators were “expressing a sense of frustration at the slowness of change in the post-Mubarak order and the continuing influence of his former allies and associates,” according to Pakistan’s The News International.

Photo credit: Suhaib Salem/Reuters

 

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