Reuters

Side-by-side photos of the city then and now.

Between 1992 and 1995, Srebrenica was ground zero for the Bosnian War. The town was seized by Serb forces, who killed 8,000 Muslim men and boys over the course of the war. Afterwards, much of Srebrenica was in ruins. But over the last fifteen years, much of the city has been rebuilt. Below, Reuters has put together shots of sites in the city in 1997 and today. They offer a stark contrast, and a lesson in urban resiliency.


 

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