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One landlord racked up more than 700 violations.

Here's one list you don't want to be on. New York City's Public Advocate has put out its latest list of the worst landlords in New York City. The winner, if you will, was a company called College Management, whose three buildings contain a whopping 724 violations, including Class C problems that represent "immediate danger."

According to NBC, residents living in College Management's buildings complain of constant rats, cockroaches, water-damaged ceilings and holes in the walls and floor. Not good stuff, especially considering average rents in the building run about $1,300 per month. One tenant reportedly even uses an umbrella when he uses the bathroom to stay dry from water dripping from the ceiling.

There are 357 other buildings on the list (owned by 330 landlords), which is updated regularly in the hope that landlords clean up their act. “It takes years of neglect for a building to deteriorate to the point where it ends up on our Watch List," Public Advocate Bill De Blasio said in a statement. "But with enough public pressure and strong tenant organizing, we can turn these buildings around and make life better for thousands of New Yorkers.”

Peruse the entire list here.

Photo credit: Roxana Gonzalez /Shutterstock

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