Reuters

Photos from around Africa's new most populous city.

Lagos, Nigeria, just surpassed Cairo as the most populous city in Africa. As we wrote yesterday:

Lagos is the center of one of the largest urban areas in the world. With a population of perhaps 1.4 million as recently as 1970, its growth has been stupendous ... the energy and other initiatives implemented by the city government are in stark contrast to the poor governance and paralysis that characterizes most of the rest of Nigeria. Meanwhile, the city continues to grow explosively. If jobs in the modern economy are to be found, it will require substantial new investment in education. Nationwide, there has been remarkably little for a generation, with the exception of the rapid expansion of the university system--itself underfunded.

But, Lagos illustrates what is possible when the government enters into a social contract with its citizens whereby in return for taxes, it provides services.

Below, photos from around the city, by Reuters photographer Finbarr O'Reilly.

A food vendor eats at her stall at Olusosun dump in Nigeria's teeming commercial capital Lagos.

Trucks line up to offload rubbish at Olusosun dump in Nigeria's teeming commercial capital Lagos.



A boy washes himself in a basin in the Makoko slum.



Actresses film a movie in Lagos.



A woman carrying an infant on her back crosses planks over water.


Children play soccer.

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