Andrew Altman will step down as CEO of the London Legacy Development Corporation.

Personnel changes are in store for the team in charge of what happens to London's Olympic Park after the closing ceremonies.

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Andrew Altman, an American serving as CEO of the London Legacy Development Corporation, will be stepping down in August after being responsible for the overhaul of Olympic Park since 2009.

Altman had been brought in by Baroness Margaret Ford, who will also be stepping down after the conclusion of the Games.

The LLDC replaced the Olympic Park Legacy Company, changing names and legal functions last April. It is now a Mayoral Development Corporation, giving mayor Boris Johnson's office more direct oversight of the park's future.

Altman's departure comes as a bit of a surprise, the LLDC's work typically satisfying the mayor. Altman helped re-envision the previous masterplan for the park's post-Olympic development. During his stint in London, the group was able to secure post-Olympic leases for all of the park's facilities minus its major stadium and media center.

Altman speaks about Olympic Park's layout during the British Design Council's 2011 Design Summit.

But those two gaping vacancies might have done Altman in. Dave Hill of The Guardian speculates that some involved with the LLDC were concerned with his abilities to deal with the complicated politics of real estate negotiations, the stadium negotiations famously unsuccessful

Unlike Athens or Beijing, the OPLC and LLDC's vision for a "Regeneration Games" has already helped secure the future for much of the city's Olympic-related infrastructure. Incoming personnel will face the task of securing the few but substantial structures still in question.

Top image: (Left to right) Communities Minister Bob Neill with Margaret Ford, Chair of the Olympic Park Legacy Company, Boris Johnson, Mayor of London, Hugh Robertson, Minister for Sports and Olympics and Andrew Altman, Chief Executive of the Olympic Park Legacy Company, at the launch of the 20 year vision for the Olympic Park on October 8, 2010. Courtesy Flickr user Department for Communities and Local Government

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