Reuters

"We were screaming for help," residents told reporters.

Scores of people were killed in weekend floods in Krymsk, a town in Russia's Black Sea region. Locals blame authorities on the ground, saying they were "let down" by their leaders. Here's on the ground reporting, from Reuters:

In Krymsk, relatives lined up to identify bodies stored in a refrigerated truck behind a local hospital. Clean-up crews were destroying rotting carcasses of livestock drowned in the flood ...

Krymsk residents also said a wall of water that swept through the mountain town was so high that the gates of a nearby reservoir must have been opened - a version denied by officials. "Nothing is left. We are like tramps," said Ovsen Torosyan, 30, as he scoured the wreckage of his home. "I bought all the furniture and electrical goods on credit and still have to finish paying for them but they have all gone."

Below, scenes from the floods:

 

 

A dog stands on the roof of a house in the town of Krymsk. Russian President Vladimir Putin ordered investigators to find out if enough was done to prevent 144 people being killed in floods in southern Russia after flying to the region to deal with the first big disaster of his new presidency. Photo by Eduard Korniyenk/Reuters
Water streams out of a hose, placed by members of the Emergencies Ministry, to dewater the flooded town of Krymsk.

Photo by Eduard Korniyenk/Reuters

Local residents stand in a flooded courtyard of a house. Photo by Eduard Korniyenk/Reuters
Photo by Eduard Korniyenk/Reuters



Photo by Eduard Korniyenk/Reuters



Photo by Eduard Korniyenk/Reuters


 

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