Reuters

Life in an abandoned rail car outside of Monterrey.

Look down, you'll see a picture of Ruth. Ruth lives with her eight family members in an abandoned train car outside of Monterrey, Mexico. It's been their home for the last 15 years. Accoridng to Reuters:

 Ruth's grandparents moved from Tamaulipas to Cadereyta after one of their sons was killed on the street by a stray bullet. The family moved into the carriage, which was empty after having been occupied by a vagabond, after living for the first five years in a rented room after arriving in Cadereyta.

Below, scenes from their life. 


Another family member, Judith, washes her hands. (Reuters)
Maria de los Santos boils water for coffee inside a train carriage she calls home in Cadereyta on the outskirts of Monterrey. (Reuters



Ruth picks up one of her cats from the train tracks outside a train carriage she calls home in Cadereyta on the outskirts of Monterrey. (Reuters/Daniel Becerril)
Emiliano stands outside the train carriage he calls home in Cadereyta. (Reuters/Daniel Becerri)

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