Drug wars and cartels have been blamed for the disappearance of at least 13 journalists since 2003.

Since 2003, 13 Mexican journalists have disappeared. Or, more accurately, they've been disappeared – seemingly swept off the face of the planet, with little trace of where they've gone or what happened to them. These 13 people are seen as victims of the violent and repressive drug cartels that have engulfed some parts of Mexico in dangerous wars over drugs and campaigns of fear.

While disappeared likely also means dead, there's a distinction here between those who've verifiably been murdered and those who've gone missing -- likely at the hands of the drug cartels. These 13 people represent the latter; they, or their bodies, have not been found.

The disappearances show two clusters: one in the western states of Michoacan and neighboring Guerrero, and eastern states of Nuevo Leon and Tamaulipas. The map was produced by Articulo 19, a group focused on press freedom in Latin America. The group also produced this map and infographic showing where journalists in Mexico have been attacked by guns and explosives.

The struggles and fears faced by the media in Mexico have been heightened in recent years as the bloodshed of cartel wars and drug trades have affected many parts of the country. According to the Committee to Protect Journalists, there have been 27 murders of journalists in Mexico since 1992 with confirmed motives to stop the gathering and sharing of information. As this recent episode of On the Media showed, covering the news in Mexico – news that often centers around the drug trade and its violence – can be dangerous and deadly. The 13 people in this map underscore this reality.

Map courtesy Articulo 19

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Transportation

    If You Drive Less Than 10,000 Miles a Year, You Probably Shouldn't Own a Car

    Up to one-quarter of all U.S. drivers might be better off using ride-sharing services instead.

  2. Equity

    Big Tech Ought to Step Up for Cities

    Leading high-tech firms have increasingly gone from heroes to villains in the eyes of their neighbors. It’s in their own interest to help make cities more affordable and inclusive.

  3. Transportation

    How Seattle Bucked a National Trend and Got More People to Ride the Bus

    Three experts in three very different positions weigh in on their city’s ridership success.

  4. Maggie Gyllenhaal walks the mean streets of 1971 New York City in HBO's "The Deuce," created by David Simon.
    Life

    David Simon Does Not Miss the Sleaziness

    The creator of HBO’s “The Deuce” talks about the rebirth of Times Square, other cities he loves, and why bureaucrats can be TV heroes, too.

  5. Equity

    The Next Frontier in Housing Affordability: Water Bills

    New legislation to charge for water use based on monthly income is cropping up in Philadelphia and Baltimore, designed to keep people from drowning in water debt.