Reuters

More than 400 zones in Britain's dominant city have extra rules. Disobeying them can get you a ticket.

There are the rules, and then there are the extra rules – special zone or neighborhood-specific regulations that can be difficult even for informed locals to keep straight. At least in London, these extra rules have now been mapped.

The map below, created by the civil rights group Manifesto Club, features five layers of London's extra rules: no leafleting zones, dispersal zones, no dog zones, alcohol confiscation zones, and no protesting zones. Together there are 435 zones that add up to more than half of the area of London.

All 435 zones of extra rules, with alcohol confiscation zones in red, no leafletting zones in green, dispersal zones in purple, no dog zones in orange and no protesting zones in blue. Source: Manifesto Club

"Zones are not generally marked with signs, but when you cross these invisible lines your normal freedoms are suspended; you can be punished for things which are not, outside of the zone, an offence," the site explains. Its description also argues that these extra rules tend to be enforced on specific groups such as the homeless and young people.

The map was created as part of the Manifesto Club's campaign against so-called "on-the-spot" fines – a relatively new policing system in London that enables officers to punish people on-the-spot for criminal offenses that would previously have been tried in courts. This effort argues that public space in London is being chipped away by overly judicious laws and enforcement tactics.

Source: Manifesto Club

Image credit: Chris Helgren / Reuters

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Smoke from the fires hangs over Brazil.
    Environment

    Why the Amazon Is on Fire

    The rash of wildfires now consuming the Amazon rainforest can be blamed on a host of human factors, from climate change to deforestation to Brazilian politics.

  2. Graduates react near the end of commencement exercises at Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia, U.S.
    Life

    Where Do College Grads Live? The Top and Bottom U.S. Cities

    Even though superstar hubs top the list of the most educated cities, other cities are growing their share at a much faster rate.

  3. An aerial photo of downtown Miami.
    Life

    The Fastest-Growing U.S. Cities Aren’t What You Think

    Looking at the population and job growth of large cities proper, rather than their metro areas, uncovers some surprises.

  4. A man sleeps in his car.
    Equity

    Finding Home in a Parking Lot

    The number of unsheltered homeless living in their cars is growing. Safe Parking programs from San Diego to King County are here to help them.

  5. Transportation

    When a Transit Agency Becomes a Suburban Developer

    The largest transit agency in the U.S. is building a mixed-use development next to a commuter rail station north of Manhattan.

×