Reuters

"Anything but our prophet," "America supports all faiths," and other signs from the protests in the Middle East.

Turmoil continues to rock the Middle East, with embassies in Benghazi, Cairo and Sanaa under siege. Below, signs from Cairo, Libya and America:


A demonstrator from the ultra conservative Salafist group holds a banner that reads "There is no God but Allah and Muhammed is his messenger" during a protest at the U.S. embassy in Cairo. (Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Reuters)


Protesters climb a fence at the U.S. embassy in Sanaa September. Hundreds of Yemeni demonstrators stormed the U.S. embassy in Sanaa on Thursday in protest against a film they consider blasphemous to Islam, and security guards tried to hold them off by firing into the air. Yemen's embassy in Washington said no casualties were reported when the protesters stormed the U.S. embassy compound in Sanaa on Thursday. The poster reads, "Anything but our prophet." (Mohamed al-Sayaghi/Reuters)


Julia Lindy holds a sign near a chalk message at the site of the proposed lower Manhattan Muslim cultural center and mosque in New York August 19, 2010. Some traumatized by the September 11, 2001 attacks have emotionally opposed a proposed Muslim community center and mosque two blocks from the site of the World Trade Center. (Brendan McDermid/Reuters)


A car passes by the mailbox for the Dove World Outreach Center in Gainesville, Florida on September 8, 2010. Pastor Terry Jones, leader of a tiny, little-known Protestant church known as the Dove World Outreach Center in Gainesville, Florida, which openly campaigns against what it calls "radical Islam," is facing a barrage of calls from U.S. government, military and religious leaders, and from abroad, to cancel his plans to publicly burn Islam's holy book. (Scott Audette/Reuters)


A policeman stands guard near a wall with graffiti at the U.S. embassy, where protesters gather to condemn a film being produced in the U.S. that insulted Prophet Mohammad, in Cairo. (Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Reuters)

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