Reuters

Violent clashes spread to almost a dozen countries.

An anti-Islam YouTube video has sparked violent uprising that are spreading from Somalia to Egypt to Tunisia to Bangladesh and Pakistan. According to the New York Times:

The broadening of the protests appeared unabated by calls for restraint from the new Islamist president of Egypt, where the demonstrations first erupted four days ago on the anniversary of the Sept. 11, 2001 attacks. In Washington, the Pentagon announced it was dispatching 50 Marines to secure the American diplomatic compound in Yemen’s capital, which was partly defiled by enraged protesters on Thursday. In Jalalabad, Afghanistan, protesters burned an effigy of President Obama.

Below, photos from the protests:

A protester displays empty cartridges he collected following clashes with riot police along a road which leads to the U.S. embassy, near Tahrir Square in Cairo. Egyptian protesters, angry at a film they say insults Prophet Mohammad, hurled stones on Friday at a line of police in Cairo blocking their way to the U.S. embassy, which was attacked earlier this week. (Amr Abdallah Dalsh/Reuters)
A protester stands in front of riot police as others set fire to police vehicles during clashes along a road which leads to the U.S. embassy, near Tahrir Square in Cairo. (Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Reuters)
 Protesters carry an injured man that was hurt during clashes along a road which leads to the U.S. embassy, near Tahrir Square in Cairo. (Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Reuters)
Riot police take cover from stones that were thrown by protesters during clashes along a road which leads to the U.S. embassy, near Tahrir Square in Cairo. (Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Reuters)
A protester throws a tear gas canister, which was earlier thrown by riot police, during clashes along a road which leads to the U.S. embassy, near Tahrir Square in Cairo. (Mohamed Abd El Ghany/Reuters)


 

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