Reuters

Lots of police clashes, and even a bit of nakedness.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel did not receive a very warm welcome on her visit to Greece. Thousands of protesters took to the streets to vent their anger at Europe's leading austerity advocate. According to the Associated Press:

Some 50,000 demonstrators marched through the city carrying signs — one, paraphrasing German poet and playwright Bertolt Brecht, read: "Angela, don’t cry. There’s nothing in the cupboard to take" — and protesting peacefully, though there were some isolated instances of rioting.

Below, photos from the protests.
 
Riot policemen drag away a protester in Syntagma Square during a violent protest against the visit of Germany's Chancellor Merkel. (Yannis Behrakis/Reuters)



Demonstrators burn a flag emblazoned with a swastika during a demonstration against the visit of German Chancellor Angela Merkel in central Athens. (Yannis Behrakis/Reuters)


Protester push a police barricade outside the parliament during a violent protest against the visit of Germany's Chancel. (Yannis Behrakis/Reuters)



A naked protester runs past the parliament in Syntagma Square in Athens. (John Kolesidis/Reuters)

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