UpTakeVideo/YouTube

Anonymous advertising is against Clear Channel Policy, but this contract was signed by mistake.

Here's the latest from the voter intimidation front: over a hundred billboards in black and Hispanic neighborhoods of Cleveland, Milwaukee and Columbus that warn of the consequences of voter fraud. "VOTER FRAUD IS A FELONY," the signs read, over an image of a judge's gavel, "Up to 3 1/2 years & $10,000 fine." Voter fraud is less common than UFO sightings. Wisconsin, in the presidential election year of 2004, had seven incidents of voter fraud.

The billboards are sponsored by an anonymous "Private Family Foundation." Anonymous advertisers are typically not permitted by Clear Channel, which owns the billboards, but the company told NPR this was a contract signed by mistake:

"We will do all we can to ensure it does not happen again," the spokesman said.

He didn't respond to questions about why the company allowed almost identical billboards to go up anonymously in Milwaukee in 2010. They were also funded by a "private family foundation."

Top image: UpTakeVideo/Youtube.

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