Revisiting a miscarriage of justice.

Here is Ken Burns' latest work, a movie that will resonate deeply with anyone who was in New York in 1989 when the story broke that a woman had been beaten and sexually assaulted in Central Park, and with anyone still there 13 years later when the last of the five boys wrongly convicted of the crime were finally released from prison. It is a story of race and injustice.

Twenty-three years after the incident and trial, The Central Park Five, which is also directed by Sarah Burns and David McMahon, is a selection for the Cannes, Telluride, and Toronto Film Festivals, and features interviews with New York City mayors Ed Koch and David Dinkins.

The film's notes and outtakes have been subpoenaed by lawyers for New York City. It is scheduled for a November 23 release date.

Trailer and poster courtesy of The Central Park Five/Florentine Films.

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