One house is left standing in the middle of a newly built road in Zhejiang province.

The Chinese have a name for buildings that resist demolition for development projects — dingzihu, or "nail house." Pictures of what may be the rapidly urbanizing country's most dramatic example, a house belonging to 67-year-old Lou Baogen and his wife located outside the city of Wenling in the Zhejiang province, have become "the latest symbol of resistance in the frequent standoffs between Chinese homeowners and local officials accused of offering too little compensation to vacate neighborhoods for major redevelopment projects," as the Associated Press reports. The surrounding neighborhood was torn down to build a road to a new railway station.

Reuters photographers captured these compelling views of the house:

A car stops beside Baogen's house in the middle of a newly built road in Wenling, Zhejiang province, on Nov. 22. (China Daily/Reuters)
Luo Baogen, 67, looks at his surroundings from the balcony in his house on Nov. 24. (Aly Song/Reuters)
Onlooking villagers stand beside

Baogen's house on Nov. 24. (Aly Song/Reuters)

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