Finally, a chance to perform home origami based on seasonal, meteorological, and astronomical conditions.

The ability to adapt is a necessary trait required to both survive and thrive in a changing world. But buildings have seldom been able to successfully acclimate to their shifting environments.

Which is what makes the new D*Dynamic so cool. David Ben Grünberg and Daniel Woolfson of D*Haus Company have created a truly transformational home inspired by mathematician Henry Dudeney that can respond to its environment by adapting to seasonal, meteorological, and astronomical conditions.

Based on Dudeney’s solving of “The Haberdasher’s Puzzle,” which allows a square to transform into an equilateral triangle, D*Dynamic can transform itself into a series of eight configurations. The external walls have the ability to unfold, forming internal walls and allowing glass interior walls to become the façade for those sunny days when you want a naturally lit abode. The open interior layout, consisting of two bedrooms, a living room, and a bathroom can adapt to various situations, such as family size, as the house transforms not only seasonally but also daily.

Images courtesy of D*Haus

This post originally appeared on Architizer, an Atlantic partner site.

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