Reuters

In chart form.

There are many reasons not to vote, even though you totally should. Here are the most common (via Brad Plumer and Kay Steiger):

Some interesting details from the Census Report that came up with the data:

  • 27 percent of Asians said they didn't vote because they were busy, considerably higher than the national average of 17.5 percent.
  • 15 percent of whites said they didn't vote because they didn't like the candidates, twice as high as any other group.
  • Young people (ages 18-24), Asians, and bachelor's-degree holders were most likely to report registration problems.

Photo credit: A supporter of U.S. president Barack Obama casts his ballot at an outdoor ballot box in Denver. (Rick Wilking/Reuters)

This post originally appeared on The Atlantic.

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