Polaron/Wikimedia Commons

Seriously, how did it take this long?

With the naming rights to nearly every U.S. sports stadium bought up, it was only a matter of time before public infrastructure succumbed to the trend. Already we have the "Barclays Center" subway stop in Brooklyn, sold for $4 million. (Citibank did not shell out for the 7-train stop near Citi Field; that one is simply called "Mets-Willets Point.")

Now, the New Hampshire legislature is considering forming a committee that would evaluate the possibility of selling off naming rights to the state's bridges, highways and roads. As the New Hampshire Union Leader points out, similar policies have been instituted in Virginia and Ohio, and in Boston. It's unclear what sort of opposition is forming in response.

Honestly, it's surprising that it took this long. But why stop with highways and bridges? I would spend a weekend in Portsmouth-Smuttynose. Or go hiking in the Crest WhiteStrips Mountains.

Top image: Polaron / Wikimedia Commons.

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