Reuters

On Sunday, President Obama pledged to "use whatever power this office holds" to prevent another mass shooting.

The Hartford Courant has pulled together tributes to the 27 people who lost their lives on Friday. In Newtown, families and clergy have come together to mourn the losses in person. Below, scenes from a town grappling with an unimaginable tragedy.

A mother embraces her daughter as they stand near a makeshift memorial close to Sandy Hook Elementary School for the victims of a school shooting in Newtown, Connecticut. (Mike Segar/Reuters)



U.S. President Barack Obama prays during a vigil held at Newtown High School for families of victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Newtown. (Kevin Lamarque/Reuters)
A woman cries at a makeshift memorial near Sandy Hook Elementary School, where a mass shooting took place, in Newtown, Connecticut. (Eric Thayer/Reuters)
Mirilyn Rodriguez and her five-year-old daughter Karla, of Waterbury, Connecticut, are reflected in a road mirror as they walk past the Sandy Hook cemetery to place balloons at a memorial for victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary shooting in Newtown, Connecticut. (Adrees Latif/Reuters)



 A woman wrapped in a Red Cross blanket holds a candle outside Newtown High School where U.S. President Barack Obama was speaking at a vigil for families of victims of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting. (Kevin Lamarque/Reuters)

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