Reuters

MTA leader Joe Lhota is expected to resign today to prepare for a mayoral run.

It looks like Joe Lhota will try to take the A train all the way to Gracie Mansion.

Lhota, the chairman of New York's Metropolitan Transit Authority, is expected to send a letter to Governor Andrew Cuomo* today announcing his resignation in preparation for a bid for mayor.

Lhota has been widely praised for leading the city's mass transit, and particularly its flooded subway system, to a speedy recovery after Hurricane Sandy, a record that will help him in a mayoral field where the early favorites -- City Council speaker Christine Quinn and Public Advocate Bill de Blasio -- have little executive experience. William Thompson and John C. Liu, former and current comptrollers, respectively, will also compete for the Democratic nomination.

Since the MTA chairman is a Republican, he may enjoy a less contested path to the general election. Though New York's voters are heavily Democratic, they have not elected a Democrat for mayor since David Dinkins in 1989. And as a deputy mayor under Rudolph Giuliani, Lhota may have the city's most famous Republican on his side: The New York Times reports that the former mayor may take an active role in his campaign.

While Lhota looks ahead, his record with the MTA -- positive budget record and fifteen minutes of fame aside -- may leave something to be desired. He has occupied the revolving door position of chairman for a mere 14 months, and his last big act will be sponsoring a fare hike to $2.50 per ride.

Top image: Reuters.

*Correction: A previous version of this article misstated the name of the governor of New York -- it is Andrew Cuomo, not Mario Cuomo.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. A photo of a police officer in El Paso, Texas.
    Equity

    What New Research Says About Race and Police Shootings

    Two new studies have revived the long-running debate over how police respond to white criminal suspects versus African Americans.

  2. A mural on the side of a building shows a man standing in a city street.
    Life

    The Polarizing Mayor Who Embodied ‘Blue-Collar Conservatism’

    Frank Rizzo, Philadelphia’s mayor from 1972 to 1980, appealed to “law and order” and white working-class identity—a sign of politics to come, says the author of a new book.

  3. Equity

    What Happened to Crime in Camden?

    Often ranked as one of the deadliest cities in America, Camden, New Jersey, ended 2017 with its lowest homicide rate since the 1980s.

  4. A Seoul Metro employee, second left, monitors passengers, to ensure face masks are worn, on a platform inside a subway station in Seoul, South Korea.
    Transportation

    How to Safely Travel on Mass Transit During Coronavirus

    To stay protected from Covid-19 on buses, trains and planes, experts say to focus more on distance from fellow passengers than air ventilation or surfaces.

  5. Equity

    The Problem With Research on Racial Bias and Police Shootings

    Despite new research on police brutality, we still have no idea whether violence toward African Americans is fueled by racial prejudice. That has consequences.

×