Reuters

Yes, that Jose Canseco.

During the Rob Ford era, Torontonians sometimes wondered if they could possibly have a more ridiculous mayor.

Yes. Yes they could. #Yeswecanseco.

Former baseball player Jose Canseco -- onetime Toronto Blue Jay, part-time entrepreneur, all-time goofball -- is investigating the possibility of running for mayor in Toronto. On Tuesday, he indicated something of the sort might be in the cards when he tweeted this New Year's resolution:

Fair warning. Today he got into specifics:

For now, it seems unlikely that Canseco, who is Cuban-American, will be able to acquire Canadian citizenship in time to run. The Toronto Star is reporting that Canseco emailed the paper this morning conceding that the citizenship issue was a difficult hurdle. But in the meantime, he is already taking on the issues:


Whatever happens, you have to admit, #yeswecanseco is a superb political slogan.

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