Reuters

The daily indignity of life at war.

It's been almost two years since the violence started in Syria. Its impacts are being lived out daily, even in the country's (relatively) peaceful cities. As NPR reports, quoting an anonymous source:

Almost every Damascene household is doubled or tripled up in the same way, hosting loved ones displaced by the violence.

With so many families sharing cramped spaces, and no clear relief in sight, Damascenes are going nutty.

"I never have alone time, and everyone is up in my business. My sister the other day told me I put too much gel in my hair!" said Rami. "I just really miss my own place."

Below, scenes from around the country.

 A woman shops for clothes at Souk al-Hamidieh in Damascus old downtown September 17,2009. Muslims are preparing to celebrate the Eid Al-Fitr holiday next week, which marks the end of the fasting month of Ramadan. (Khaled al-Hariri/Reuters)
Abdlhamid Haj Omar, 70, lost three sons and two grandsons in the ongoing Syrian crisis. (Ahmed Jadallah/Reuters)
Men wait to buy bread in front of a bakery shop during winter in Al Qusayr. (Goran Tomasevic/Reuters)



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