3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms, and central air.

Every couple of years, the U.S. Census conducts an exhaustive survey of households across the country to collect detailed information about U.S. residences: “How many stories does your home have?” “Do you have a usable fireplace?” “Do you have a smoke detector, and if so, does it run on batteries?”

Data from its most recent such survey, conducted in 2011, were released last week, and it paints an elaborate picture of current living conditions in the U.S. The faux real estate listing above draws on that data to depict the prototypical U.S. home. The median monthly cost of either renting or owning such an abode is $927, which is about a fifth of the median household income in the U.S.

Some aspects of the American home have changed dramatically since the first survey was conducted in 1973 (which makes sense because half of the occupied homes today were built in 1974 or later). Central air conditioning was a luxury that only 18% of households enjoyed back then, but the number grew to 43% in 1993, and today 66% of dwellings have central AC.

The number of bathrooms in a typical home has also grown. From 1973 to 1991, one bathroom was the norm, and for the next 20 years, it was one and a half bathrooms. The 2011 survey is the first time that the median residence was found to have 2 or more.

A few other facts about the modern US household:

  • Roughly 35 percent of occupied homes have a usable fireplace, up from 32 percent in 1993.
  • 16 percent have a swimming pool.
  • There is both an 11 percent chance of finding at least one mouse and an 11 percent chance of finding at least one cockroach in a US residence over the course of a year.

This post originally appeared on Quartz, an Atlantic partner site.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Environment

    A 13,235-Mile Road Trip for 70-Degree Weather Every Day

    This year-long journey across the U.S. keeps you at consistent high temperatures.

  2. A photo of a police officer in El Paso, Texas.
    Equity

    What New Research Says About Race and Police Shootings

    Two new studies have revived the long-running debate over how police respond to white criminal suspects versus African Americans.

  3. a photo of bikes on a bridge in Amsterdam
    Transportation

    Street by Street, Amsterdam Is Cutting Cars Out of the Picture

    Armed with a street-design tool called the knip, the Dutch capital is slashing car access in the city center, and expanding public transit hours.

  4. A woman stands in front of a house.
    Life

    How Housing Wealth Transferred From Families to Corporations

    The Great Housing Reset has led to growing numbers of single-family homes shifting from owner-occupied housing to investment vehicles for large corporations.

  5. a photo of a NYC bus
    Transportation

    Why the Bus Got So Bad, and How to Save It

    TransitCenter’s Steven Higashide has created a how-to guide to help city leaders and public transportation advocates save struggling bus systems.

×