The 85-year-old leader of the Roman Catholic world gives his last general address.

Pope Benedict XVI gave his final general address earlier today in Vatican City, prior to his resignation taking effect tomorrow. The New York Times notes that the 85-year-old Pope is the first to resign in six centuries, and reported on the scene in St. Peter's Square:

Vatican officials said 150,000 people packed into the square and the avenue leading to it to hear the pope speak, although other estimates put the figure lower. Around 70 cardinals lined up to listen to him in their crimson skullcaps.

Below, Reuters captured one of his last moments as the leader of the Roman Catholic world.
 
 
Pope Benedict XVI holds his last general audience in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican on February 27. (Alessandro Bianchi/Reuters)
A general view of a packed St. Peter's Square at the Vatican where Pope Benedict XVI holds his last general audience on February 27. (Stefano Rellandini/Reuters)
A sign reading "Thank you" in Italian is held in St. Peter's Square as Pope Benedict XVI holds his last general audience at the Vatican on February 27. (Max Rossi/Reuters)
Pope Benedict XVI waves to the faithful after arriving in St. Peter's Square to hold his last general audience at the Vatican on February 27. (Max Rossi/Reuters)
Cardinal Bernard Law (C) of the U.S. attends the last general audience of Pope Benedict XVI in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican on February 27. (Alessandro Bianchi/Reuters)

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Life

    Having a Library or Cafe Down the Block Could Change Your Life

    Living close to public amenities—from parks to grocery stores—increases trust, decreases loneliness, and restores faith in local government.

  2. Opponents of SB 50.
    Equity

    Despite Resistance, Cities Turn to Density to Tackle Housing Inequality

    Residential "upzoning” policies being adopted from Minneapolis to Seattle were once politically out of the question. Now they’re just politically fraught.

  3. A map of the money service-class workers have left over after paying for housing
    Equity

    Blue-Collar and Service Workers Fare Better Outside Superstar Cities

    How much money do workers have after paying housing costs? For working-class and service workers in superstar cities, the affordable housing crisis hits harder.

  4. Two horses standing in a field with fences and a large white barn in the background.
    Design

    America’s First Greenbelt May Be in Jeopardy

    Adopted in the 1950s to protect the city’s iconic horse farms, the urban growth boundary of Lexington, Kentucky, no longer seems unassailable.

  5. Four scooters that say "Available on Uber."
    Perspective

    The California Legislature Is Getting Played by Micromobility Companies

    If the California legislature passes AB 1112, cities can’t require companies like Bird, Lime, and Jump to limit numbers, meet equity goals, or fully share data.