If destructive fantasies are, like imitation, a form of flattery, then New York City should feel pretty good about itself.

If destructive fantasies are, like imitation, a form of flattery, then New York City should feel pretty good about itself.

In a video posted today on the North Korean propaganda website Uriminzokkiri, the largest U.S. city is the target of North Korea's rocket-propelled wrath.

The protagonist of the video is a young Korean man deep in a dream of rocket travel that culminates in the bombing of a New York lookalike, its identity revealed chiefly by a brief shot of the five boroughs at minute 2:05.

The footage of destruction that follows may look familiar -- it's taken from the (American) video game Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3. The music is a Muzak-style rendition of the (American) song "We Are the World," written by Michael Jackson and Lionel Ritchie for charity in 1985.

No word yet on who deserves credit for the shots of the spacecraft blazing a trail of fire across the sky, looking more like the behind of a sheet-draped elephant than a piece of modern technology.

But back to the action: as the fireballs careen into buildings, our young hero intones, "Just imagine riding in a North Korean spaceship. One day, my dream will come true. No matter how hard the imperialists try to isolate and stifle us, they will not stop our people’s path toward our final victory of achieving a unified, strong and prosperous Korea.”

That's the translation from the New York Times; at other points, the Times and Agence France-Presse, which unearthed the video, differ on the particulars. The Times went with:

"It appears that the headquarters of evil... is going up in flames it itself has ignited."

AFP went with a more colorful metaphor:

"It seems that the nest of wickedness is ablaze with the fire started by itself."

I think both translations get the message across. The Times also reminds us that North Korean rockets are not considered a threat to reach the United States.

Via LiveLeak.

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