Join in as we discuss how far city governments can go to push people to protect their health.

Less than 24 hours before New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg's ban on large-size sugary beverages was supposed to go into effect, New York Supreme Court Judge Milton Tingling struck down the ban yesterday. While Bloomberg has pledged to appeal the decision, we've teamed up with Yahoo! News for a live chat on what's next. Join in below with Beth Fouhy, Yahoo! News senior editor for politics and national news; Holly Bailey and Dylan Stableford, Yahoo! News reporters; and our own John Metcalfe, as we discuss how far city governments can go to push people to protect their health.

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