WTSP

The hole underneath the house is estimated to be more than 100 feet wide, but it is not visible from outside the house.

A 100-foot wide sinkhole opened up directly under a house in the town of Seffner, Florida, last night, nearly killing two brothers and forcing authorities to evacuate the entire neighborhood. One of the brothers, a 36-year-old man, is missing and presumed dead, but firefighters have been unable to fully investigate because the house itself is deemed too unsafe to be inside. The hole underneath the house is estimated to be more than 100 feet wide, but it is not visible from outside the house.

The other brother told rescuers that he heard screams coming from his brother's bedroom around 11:00 p.m. last night, but by the time he got to the room, the bed and everything in it had been swallowed up by the ground caving in beneath it. He tried to rescue his brother, but firefighters eventually had to pull the brother back from the edge of the sinkhole, which continued to grow and threatens to bring down the entire house. Even some of the monitoring equipment to search for the missing man was lost inside the hole. Authorities are bringing in more engineers on Friday to assess the damage and determine just how big the sinkhole might actually be beneath the ground.



This post originally appeared on The Atlantic Wire.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. photo: San Diego's Trolley
    Transportation

    Out of Darkness, Light Rail!

    In an era of austere federal funding for urban public transportation, light rail seemed to make sense. Did the little trains of the 1980s pull their own weight?

  2. Transportation

    In Paris, a Very Progressive Agenda Is Going Mainstream

    Boosted by big sustainability wins, Mayor Anne Hidalgo is pitching bold plans to make the city center “100 percent bicycle” and turn office space into housing.

  3. A photo of a police officer in El Paso, Texas.
    Equity

    What New Research Says About Race and Police Shootings

    Two new studies have revived the long-running debate over how police respond to white criminal suspects versus African Americans.

  4. Solar panel installers work on the rooftops of some of Baltimore's poorest neighborhoods.
    Equity

    An Uncertain Future for Solar

    Trump slapped tariffs on imported solar panels at a time when African Americans were seeing unique job growth in the industry.

  5. Equity

    What ‘Livability’ Looks Like for Black Women

    Livability indexes can obscure the experiences of non-white people. CityLab analyzed the outcomes just for black women, for a different kind of ranking.

×