Joshua Roberts/Reuters

Will the Texas congressman pay up?

Politicians: they're just like us. They get parking tickets; they get real mad.

When Representative Louie Gohmert (R-TX) received a ticket earlier this month for parking his car in a National Park Service spot outside the Lincoln Memorial, he was incensed. Politico reports  that officers described him as "rude and irate" and as "ranting."

But here's where the congressman and the common man part ways. Rep. Gohmert slipped his business card, and the ticket, under the window of a police car with a note: "Oversight of Park Service is my job!" (Gohmert does serve on the House subcommittee on national parks, forests and public lands.) He would not pay, he said.

Though lawmakers are given wide leeway to park their cars in otherwise off-limits spaces in D.C. while on "official business," Gohmert, according to his communications director, was doing a little sightseeing with his family.

The value of the ticket? $25.

Photo: Joshua Roberts/Reuters.

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