Reuters

Makeshift memorials from around the city.

In the aftermath of a tragedy, it's not always easy to know how to show your grief and solidarity. The Boston Globe today wrote about Julia Bruss, grappling with that question. They write:

[Julie Bruss] figured out how to best retaliate against whoever bombed her neighborhood ... She stepped outside her apartment building ... She walked down Newbury Street and said hello to her neighbors. They all said hello back.

“I live here,” she said, sitting at a table inside L’Aroma Cafe on Newbury, exacting revenge by doing exactly what she would have done if someone had never put two bombs a block away on Boylston Street. “No one, no one, can make me leave my neighborhood.”

Across the city, others are doing something similar -- stopping by memorials, talking to neighbors, paying their respects at vigils and services. Below, makeshift memorials and shrines of healing from around the city.

A jogger passes a sign reading "Stay Strong Boston" taped onto a bus stop in Boston, Massachusetts. (/Brian Snyder/Reuters)
A Boston Red Sox hat is seen among a makeshift memorial for the victims of the Boston Marathon bombings on Boylston street in Boston, Massachusetts. (Shannon Stapleton/Reuters)
Boston police officer Pat Duggan writes in chalk outside a makeshift memorial along Newbury street in Boston, Massachusetts. (Shannon Stapleton/Reuters)
Boston Bruins Dennis Seidenberg observes a moment of silence for the victims of the Boston Marathon bombings before the start of an NHL hockey game against the Buffalo Sabres at TD Garden in Boston, Massachusetts. (Jessica Rinaldi/Reuters)
A foam placard in the shape of a hand gesturing number one stands by a makeshift memorial for the victims of the Boston Marathon bombings on Boylston street in Boston, Massachusetts. (Shannon Stapleton/Reuters)

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