Reuters

Workers demand safer conditions; government action after the worst accident in the country's short history.

Dhaka exploded in protests this week, as Bangladesh's many factory workers called for justice after a building collapse killed at least 389 workers.

Many of the men and women killed were between the ages of 18 and 22. A week later, families are still camped out in the rubble waiting for some sign of their loved ones. According to CNN, "a strong stench of rotting human flesh has taken over the scene." They write:

Some relatives have lost work while waiting at the site. Many sleep on the street or quietly clutch a photo. One man was talking to himself with a photo of his son in his hand. "Yesterday a woman told me, 'I want the dead body of my daughter so I can take her dead body home to bury,' " [Ali] Khan, [editor of the local paper] said.

The collapse of the nine-story building was the worst incident of this kind in the country's history, but by no means exceptional -- just a couple of months ago a factory fire killed scores.

The incident has sparked protests around Dhaka. Workers marched outside of their factories on Monday; some opposition turned violent. Bangladeshi government officials have promised a nationwide probe of the country's garment factories and the clothing chain Primark has said it will compensate to the families of the women who lost their lives. The company occupied a floor in the collapsed building.

Below, scenes from Dhaka via Reuters.

Relative show pictures of garment workers who are missing, during a protest to demand capital punishment for those responsible for the collapse of the Rana Plaza building, in Savar, outside Dhaka. (Andrew Biraj/Reuters)

Relatives of missing garment workers stop an army jeep during a protest to demand capital punishment for those responsible for the collapse of the Rana Plaza building in Savar, outside Dhaka. (/Khurshed Rinku/Reuters)

Garment workers shout slogans as they set fire on wood during the blockage of a street to demand the arrest of those responsible for the collapse of the Rana Plaza building in Savar. (Reuters)

A worker cleans up a restaurant after garment workers broke the glass at Gulshan in Dhaka. (Reuters)

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. Smoke from the fires hangs over Brazil.
    Environment

    Why the Amazon Is on Fire

    The rash of wildfires now consuming the Amazon rainforest can be blamed on a host of human factors, from climate change to deforestation to Brazilian politics.

  2. Graduates react near the end of commencement exercises at Liberty University in Lynchburg, Virginia, U.S.
    Life

    Where Do College Grads Live? The Top and Bottom U.S. Cities

    Even though superstar hubs top the list of the most educated cities, other cities are growing their share at a much faster rate.

  3. An aerial photo of downtown Miami.
    Life

    The Fastest-Growing U.S. Cities Aren’t What You Think

    Looking at the population and job growth of large cities proper, rather than their metro areas, uncovers some surprises.

  4. a map of London Uber driver James Farrar's trip data.
    Transportation

    For Ride-Hailing Drivers, Data Is Power

    Uber drivers in Europe and the U.S. are fighting for access to their personal data. Whoever wins the lawsuit could get to reframe the terms of the gig economy.

  5. A man sleeps in his car.
    Equity

    Finding Home in a Parking Lot

    The number of unsheltered homeless living in their cars is growing. Safe Parking programs from San Diego to King County are here to help them.

×