Shannon Stapleton/Reuters

Locals on social media report a distinct lack of chaos, "just a feeling that everyone is focused."

Social media this morning is filled with well-wishers and prayers for those affected by Monday's bombings at the Boston Marathon. Many are posting pictures of themselves wearing blue and yellow (the Marathon's colors), and #bostonmarathon and #prayforboston are both heavily-used hashtags. From those in the city itself, the overarching sense is that parts of Boston, especially closer to downtown, have taken on an "eerie" stillness the morning after.

Many were tweeting and retweeting photos of an empty Boylston Street. (Note that Twitter's timestamps may not be accurate due to ongoing technical issues at the social networking site.)

Digital consultant Ramsey Mohsen posted photos of the heavy police presence outside his hotel.

Dianna Russini, a reporter for NBC Connecticut, and local Emily Carlucci, both posted impressions of a distinct lack of chaos.

And in perhaps the most chilling shot of this morning's aftermath, the Associated Press posted a photo (click through link to view) of the home of the 8-year-old boy who was among those killed in yesterday's attacks.

About the Author

Most Popular

  1. a photo of a Metro PCS store in Washington, D.C.
    Equity

    What D.C.’s Go-Go Showdown Reveals About Gentrification

    A neighborhood debate over music swiftly became something bigger, and louder: a cry for self-determination from a community that is struggling to be heard.

  2. Equity

    The Hidden Horror of Hudson Yards Is How It Was Financed

    Manhattan’s new luxury mega-project was partially bankrolled by an investor visa program called EB-5, which was meant to help poverty-stricken areas.

  3. The facade of a casino in Atlantic City.
    Photos

    Photographing the Trumpian Urbanism of Atlantic City

    Brian Rose’s new book uses the deeply troubled New Jersey city as a window into how a developer-turned-president operates.

  4. a photo of San Francisco tourists posing before the city's iconic skyline.
    Life

    Cities Don’t Have Souls. Why Do We Battle For Them?

    What do we mean when we say that the “soul of the city” is under threat? Often, it’s really about politics, nostalgia, and the fear of community change.

  5. A new map of neighborhood change in U.S. metros shows where displacement is the main problem, and where economic decline persists.
    Equity

    From Gentrification to Decline: How Neighborhoods Really Change

    A new report and accompanying map finds extreme gentrification in a few cities, but the dominant trend—particularly in the suburbs—is the concentration of low-income population.