Shannon Stapleton/Reuters

Locals on social media report a distinct lack of chaos, "just a feeling that everyone is focused."

Social media this morning is filled with well-wishers and prayers for those affected by Monday's bombings at the Boston Marathon. Many are posting pictures of themselves wearing blue and yellow (the Marathon's colors), and #bostonmarathon and #prayforboston are both heavily-used hashtags. From those in the city itself, the overarching sense is that parts of Boston, especially closer to downtown, have taken on an "eerie" stillness the morning after.

Many were tweeting and retweeting photos of an empty Boylston Street. (Note that Twitter's timestamps may not be accurate due to ongoing technical issues at the social networking site.)

Digital consultant Ramsey Mohsen posted photos of the heavy police presence outside his hotel.

Dianna Russini, a reporter for NBC Connecticut, and local Emily Carlucci, both posted impressions of a distinct lack of chaos.

And in perhaps the most chilling shot of this morning's aftermath, the Associated Press posted a photo (click through link to view) of the home of the 8-year-old boy who was among those killed in yesterday's attacks.

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